Kierra Sheard talks 'Graceland', Preachers of L.A, Sundays Best and more

Kierra Sheard just dropped her new album Graceland and it shot to No.1 on iTunes on it’s first day out.
CocoaFab caught up with the God-fearing songstress to get details on her new project and find out what she thinks about religious reality shows and the criticism they attract. We also got her to dish details about The Sheards and her judging stint on BET’s Sunday Best.

The 27-year-old star says Graceland is her most personal project to date and she couldn’t be more proud of how it turned out.
“It’s the most transparent piece of work that I have put out for the world. I was nervous at first because it’s a totally different route than my last record but the response has been absolutely amazing,” she says.
I think as we mature naturally and spiritually we become more comfortable in our own skin. The more comfortable we become, the more we accept ourselves and we say, take it or leave it.”
The soulful sweetheart is hoping her music will reach people who don’t usually gravitate toward gospel.
My dream is to go after those who are not in the church. I want to go after those who don’t know the Lord. This record is for those who are already believers but it’s also an urban sound that will appeal to people who don’t traditionally go toward gospel music,” she explains.
Who is to say a record won’t save someone from committing suicide because they thought they were the only one going through things?”
On the album, Kierra is finally opening up about her struggles in her music and hoping it helps others do the same.
“I have always been scared to say certain things in music and this whole record helps me conquer that. I’m willing to give that piece of me because I’m obviously going through things to share it with other people. Every song on this album is my favorite. “Free” is one of my favorites but “Graceland” is my most transparent piece. It shows that I’m growing and there’s a beauty to that,” she explains.
As the star of her own family-based reality series, The Sheards, she knows a thing or two about what happens when cameras start rolling.
“I did have some reservations about reality TV when we got the offer. I know there has to be some kind of drama and I think I’m boring. I like to eat, shop and go to church. I was really nervous in the beginning,” she says.
“I’m not going to fight nobody and I ain’t gonna argue with you either. What helped me maintain my cool on television was being myself. We’re also producers so we have some creative control.”
One thing she’s not too happy about is the backlash religious reality shows like Preachers Of L.A. attracts from viewers.
As a pastor’s daughter, she weighed in on whether or not wealthy preachers are sending the wrong message with their mansions and Mercedes’.
“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being successful because The Bible talks about being wealthy. The Bible says money is the answer to all things and in this life, it is. You have to get a job that will pay you so you can live comfortably. If you understand your purpose in life and understand who God is in your life, I don’t think money should affect your faith in any way,” she says.
“The way we worship the Lord is by being good managers of what God has given us. if God gives me a million dollars and makes me a millionaire, then I ask, in what way am I giving to those in need? In what way am I managing my money well so I’m not in a rut? In what way am I worshipping the Lord with my money?”
According to Kierra, plenty of preachers have been been judged too harshly for their lifestyle choices.
“Every pastor is not dishonest. I think it’s very unfair that the world casts that judgment on the shepherds. That’s not fair. What about the pastor that builds a church and builds his business outside of the church? Can he not do that?,” she says.
“Having that fear of God and respect for him is important. I don’t think having money and buying a Mercedes means you’re not a Christian. Your walk is built into your character. Those material things have nothing to do with your character. I don’t think there’s nothing wrong with wearing red-bottoms. We like nice things. Even a poor person likes nice things.”
Aside from promoting her awesome new album, Kierra is enjoying her time as a judge’s table alongside Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams on BET’s Sunday Best.
“Sunday Best is a lot of fun. I was hesitant about judging because of my age but when I thought about it, I have been singing since I was 9 years old. I do have something to say and I have something to share with people,” she says.
“I’m not on the show to bash anyone or beat them up. I’m there to share my experience from my journey and my career. Even in that platform, I’m still learning from people on the show. The contestants are great. The other judges have embraced me as the new kid on the block.”
 Get Graceland on iTunes now
 
-Interviewed by  CocoaFab.com
Kierra Sheard just dropped her new album Graceland and it shot to No.1 on iTunes on it’s first day out.
CocoaFab caught up with the God-fearing songstress to get details on her new project and find out what she thinks about religious reality shows and the criticism they attract. We also got her to dish details about The Sheards and her judging stint on BET’s Sunday Best.
The 27-year-old star says Graceland is her most personal project to date and she couldn’t be more proud of how it turned out.
“It’s the most transparent piece of work that I have put out for the world. I was nervous at first because it’s a totally different route than my last record but the response has been absolutely amazing,” she says.
“I think as we mature naturally and spiritually we become more comfortable in our own skin. The more comfortable we become, the more we accept ourselves and we say, take it or leave it.”
The soulful sweetheart is hoping her music will reach people who don’t usually gravitate toward gospel.
“My dream is to go after those who are not in the church. I want to go after those who don’t know the Lord. This record is for those who are already believers but it’s also an urban sound that will appeal to people who don’t traditionally go toward gospel music,” she explains.
“Who is to say a record won’t save someone from committing suicide because they thought they were the only one going through things?”
On the album, Kierra is finally opening up about her struggles in her music and hoping it helps others do the same.
“I have always been scared to say certain things in music and this whole record helps me conquer that. I’m willing to give that piece of me because I’m obviously going through things to share it with other people. Every song on this album is my favorite. “Free” is one of my favorites but “Graceland” is my most transparent piece. It shows that I’m growing and there’s a beauty to that,” she explains.
As the star of her own family-based reality series, The Sheards, she knows a thing or two about what happens when cameras start rolling.
“I did have some reservations about reality TV when we got the offer. I know there has to be some kind of drama and I think I’m boring. I like to eat, shop and go to church. I was really nervous in the beginning,” she says.
“I’m not going to fight nobody and I ain’t gonna argue with you either. What helped me maintain my cool on television was being myself. We’re also producers so we have some creative control.”
One thing she’s not too happy about is the backlash religious reality shows like Preachers Of L.A. attracts from viewers.
As a pastor’s daughter, she weighed in on whether or not wealthy preachers are sending the wrong message with their mansions and Mercedes’.
“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being successful because The Bible talks about being wealthy. The Bible says money is the answer to all things and in this life, it is. You have to get a job that will pay you so you can live comfortably. If you understand your purpose in life and understand who God is in your life, I don’t think money should affect your faith in any way,” she says.
“The way we worship the Lord is by being good managers of what God has given us. if God gives me a million dollars and makes me a millionaire, then I ask, in what way am I giving to those in need? In what way am I managing my money well so i’m not in a rut? In what way am I worshipping the Lord with my money?”
According to Kierra, plenty of preachers have been been judged too harshly for their lifestyle choices.
“Every pastor is not dishonest. I think it’s very unfair that the world casts that judgment on the shepherds. That’s not fair. What about the pastor that builds a church and builds his business outside of the church? Can he not do that?,” she says.
“Having that fear of God and respect for him is important. I don’t think having money and buying a Mercedes means you’re not a Christian. Your walk is built into your character. Those material things have nothing to do with your character. I don’t think there’a nothing wrong with wearing red-bottoms. We like nice things. Even a poor person likes nice things.”
Aside from promoting her awesome new album, Kierra is enjoying her time as a judge’s table alongside Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams on BET’s Sunday Best.
“Sunday Best is a lot of fun. I was hesitant about judging because of my age but when I thought about it, I have been singing since I was 9 years old. I do have something to say and I have something to share with people,” she says.
“I’m not on the show to bash anyone or beat them up. I’m there to share my experience from my journey and my career. Even in that platform, I’m still learning from people on the show. The contestants are great. The other judges have embraced me as the new kid on the block.”
Graceland is available on iTunes now
- See more at: http://cocoafab.com/exclusive-kierra-sheard-talks-new-album-religious-reality-every-pastor-is-not-dishonest/#sthash.Hcc3oJ3l.dpuf
Kierra Sheard just dropped her new album Graceland and it shot to No.1 on iTunes on it’s first day out.
CocoaFab caught up with the God-fearing songstress to get details on her new project and find out what she thinks about religious reality shows and the criticism they attract. We also got her to dish details about The Sheards and her judging stint on BET’s Sunday Best.
The 27-year-old star says Graceland is her most personal project to date and she couldn’t be more proud of how it turned out.
“It’s the most transparent piece of work that I have put out for the world. I was nervous at first because it’s a totally different route than my last record but the response has been absolutely amazing,” she says.
“I think as we mature naturally and spiritually we become more comfortable in our own skin. The more comfortable we become, the more we accept ourselves and we say, take it or leave it.”
The soulful sweetheart is hoping her music will reach people who don’t usually gravitate toward gospel.
“My dream is to go after those who are not in the church. I want to go after those who don’t know the Lord. This record is for those who are already believers but it’s also an urban sound that will appeal to people who don’t traditionally go toward gospel music,” she explains.
“Who is to say a record won’t save someone from committing suicide because they thought they were the only one going through things?”
On the album, Kierra is finally opening up about her struggles in her music and hoping it helps others do the same.
“I have always been scared to say certain things in music and this whole record helps me conquer that. I’m willing to give that piece of me because I’m obviously going through things to share it with other people. Every song on this album is my favorite. “Free” is one of my favorites but “Graceland” is my most transparent piece. It shows that I’m growing and there’s a beauty to that,” she explains.
As the star of her own family-based reality series, The Sheards, she knows a thing or two about what happens when cameras start rolling.
“I did have some reservations about reality TV when we got the offer. I know there has to be some kind of drama and I think I’m boring. I like to eat, shop and go to church. I was really nervous in the beginning,” she says.
“I’m not going to fight nobody and I ain’t gonna argue with you either. What helped me maintain my cool on television was being myself. We’re also producers so we have some creative control.”
One thing she’s not too happy about is the backlash religious reality shows like Preachers Of L.A. attracts from viewers.
As a pastor’s daughter, she weighed in on whether or not wealthy preachers are sending the wrong message with their mansions and Mercedes’.
“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being successful because The Bible talks about being wealthy. The Bible says money is the answer to all things and in this life, it is. You have to get a job that will pay you so you can live comfortably. If you understand your purpose in life and understand who God is in your life, I don’t think money should affect your faith in any way,” she says.
“The way we worship the Lord is by being good managers of what God has given us. if God gives me a million dollars and makes me a millionaire, then I ask, in what way am I giving to those in need? In what way am I managing my money well so i’m not in a rut? In what way am I worshipping the Lord with my money?”
According to Kierra, plenty of preachers have been been judged too harshly for their lifestyle choices.
“Every pastor is not dishonest. I think it’s very unfair that the world casts that judgment on the shepherds. That’s not fair. What about the pastor that builds a church and builds his business outside of the church? Can he not do that?,” she says.
“Having that fear of God and respect for him is important. I don’t think having money and buying a Mercedes means you’re not a Christian. Your walk is built into your character. Those material things have nothing to do with your character. I don’t think there’a nothing wrong with wearing red-bottoms. We like nice things. Even a poor person likes nice things.”
Aside from promoting her awesome new album, Kierra is enjoying her time as a judge’s table alongside Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams on BET’s Sunday Best.
“Sunday Best is a lot of fun. I was hesitant about judging because of my age but when I thought about it, I have been singing since I was 9 years old. I do have something to say and I have something to share with people,” she says.
“I’m not on the show to bash anyone or beat them up. I’m there to share my experience from my journey and my career. Even in that platform, I’m still learning from people on the show. The contestants are great. The other judges have embraced me as the new kid on the block.”
- See more at: http://cocoafab.com/exclusive-kierra-sheard-talks-new-album-religious-reality-every-pastor-is-not-dishonest/#sthash.pVxYUMYt.dpuf
Kierra Sheard just dropped her new album Graceland and it shot to No.1 on iTunes on it’s first day out.
CocoaFab caught up with the God-fearing songstress to get details on her new project and find out what she thinks about religious reality shows and the criticism they attract. We also got her to dish details about The Sheards and her judging stint on BET’s Sunday Best.
The 27-year-old star says Graceland is her most personal project to date and she couldn’t be more proud of how it turned out.
“It’s the most transparent piece of work that I have put out for the world. I was nervous at first because it’s a totally different route than my last record but the response has been absolutely amazing,” she says.
“I think as we mature naturally and spiritually we become more comfortable in our own skin. The more comfortable we become, the more we accept ourselves and we say, take it or leave it.”
The soulful sweetheart is hoping her music will reach people who don’t usually gravitate toward gospel.
“My dream is to go after those who are not in the church. I want to go after those who don’t know the Lord. This record is for those who are already believers but it’s also an urban sound that will appeal to people who don’t traditionally go toward gospel music,” she explains.
“Who is to say a record won’t save someone from committing suicide because they thought they were the only one going through things?”
On the album, Kierra is finally opening up about her struggles in her music and hoping it helps others do the same.
“I have always been scared to say certain things in music and this whole record helps me conquer that. I’m willing to give that piece of me because I’m obviously going through things to share it with other people. Every song on this album is my favorite. “Free” is one of my favorites but “Graceland” is my most transparent piece. It shows that I’m growing and there’s a beauty to that,” she explains.
As the star of her own family-based reality series, The Sheards, she knows a thing or two about what happens when cameras start rolling.
“I did have some reservations about reality TV when we got the offer. I know there has to be some kind of drama and I think I’m boring. I like to eat, shop and go to church. I was really nervous in the beginning,” she says.
“I’m not going to fight nobody and I ain’t gonna argue with you either. What helped me maintain my cool on television was being myself. We’re also producers so we have some creative control.”
One thing she’s not too happy about is the backlash religious reality shows like Preachers Of L.A. attracts from viewers.
As a pastor’s daughter, she weighed in on whether or not wealthy preachers are sending the wrong message with their mansions and Mercedes’.
“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being successful because The Bible talks about being wealthy. The Bible says money is the answer to all things and in this life, it is. You have to get a job that will pay you so you can live comfortably. If you understand your purpose in life and understand who God is in your life, I don’t think money should affect your faith in any way,” she says.
“The way we worship the Lord is by being good managers of what God has given us. if God gives me a million dollars and makes me a millionaire, then I ask, in what way am I giving to those in need? In what way am I managing my money well so i’m not in a rut? In what way am I worshipping the Lord with my money?”
According to Kierra, plenty of preachers have been been judged too harshly for their lifestyle choices.
“Every pastor is not dishonest. I think it’s very unfair that the world casts that judgment on the shepherds. That’s not fair. What about the pastor that builds a church and builds his business outside of the church? Can he not do that?,” she says.
“Having that fear of God and respect for him is important. I don’t think having money and buying a Mercedes means you’re not a Christian. Your walk is built into your character. Those material things have nothing to do with your character. I don’t think there’a nothing wrong with wearing red-bottoms. We like nice things. Even a poor person likes nice things.”
Aside from promoting her awesome new album, Kierra is enjoying her time as a judge’s table alongside Kirk Franklin, Donnie McClurkin and Yolanda Adams on BET’s Sunday Best.
“Sunday Best is a lot of fun. I was hesitant about judging because of my age but when I thought about it, I have been singing since I was 9 years old. I do have something to say and I have something to share with people,” she says.
“I’m not on the show to bash anyone or beat them up. I’m there to share my experience from my journey and my career. Even in that platform, I’m still learning from people on the show. The contestants are great. The other judges have embraced me as the new kid on the block.”
- See more at: http://cocoafab.com/exclusive-kierra-sheard-talks-new-album-religious-reality-every-pastor-is-not-dishonest/#sthash.pVxYUMYt.dpuf
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